Our blog entries follow our love of Cars and Trucks!

Vehicle Tempertures in the Summer

Vehicle Temperatures in the Heat of the Summer .

Do you know just how quickly your cars temperature heats up? Even with windows open. In the Heat of the Summer sometimes we forget and leave things in our vehicles that the heat will ruin or perhaps maybe you decide to take you furry family members. Just don’t forget and leave them in the car, they cannot stand this high temperatures for no time at all. Here is a Estimated Vehicle Interior Air Temperature vs. Elapsed time that’s tell you what temperatures get up to in your car while your away.

Temperature-inside-car-chart1

 

Click below to Shop our Online Store

ebay

ebay! shop online via hollander http://standridge.hollanderstores.com/ shop our ebay store http://stores.ebay.com/standridgeautoparts1  Used auto body parts within gastonia, greer gaffney spartanburg rock hill forrest city rutherfordton cherryville lincolnton waco polkville fallston belmont charlotte north carolina south carolina georgia tennessee nashville blacksburg virgina kings mountain mount holly lattimore lawndale cliffside asheville hickory hills of north carolina marion greensboro the triangle pittsboro raleigh winston salem UNC NCSTATE cheap auto parts for college students locally owned and operated fort mill shadyside drag strip dirt track racing  nascar billy standridge Quality Used Auto Parts friendly service import domestics trucks auto recyclers wheels ARA foreign cars recycled vehicle parts gatlinburg tennessee classic cars car fun facts cars & trucks SUV SUT hummer motors engines transmissions drive shafts transfer cases speedometers window regulators side view mirrors window glass fenders hoods body shop mechanics shop don’t overpay at the mechanic girlpower sisters recyclers starters alternators AC compressors condensers airbags coil packs fuse boxes fuse

Redneck Car Repairs That Are Borderline Genius

Redneck Car Repairs That Are Borderline Genius

Listen, it’s not stupid if it works. And these redneck inventions work!

Check them out here → Source: 16 Redneck Car Repairs That Are Borderline Genius

 

 

 

Click below to Shop our Online Store

ebay

Redneck Car Repairs that are borderline genius  Shop ebay! shop online via hollander http://standridge.hollanderstores.com/ shop our ebay store http://stores.ebay.com/standridgeautoparts1  Used auto body parts within gastonia, greer gaffney spartanburg rock hill forrest city rutherfordton cherryville lincolnton waco polkville fallston belmont charlotte north carolina south carolina georgia tennessee nashville blacksburg virgina kings mountain mount holly lattimore lawndale cliffside asheville hickory hills of north carolina marion greensboro the triangle pittsboro raleigh winston salem UNC NCSTATE cheap auto parts for college students locally owned and operated fort mill shadyside drag strip dirt track racing  nascar billy standridge Quality Used Auto Parts friendly service import domestics trucks auto recyclers wheels ARA foreign cars recycled vehicle parts gatlinburg tennessee classic cars car fun facts cars & trucks SUV SUT hummer motors engines transmissions drive shafts transfer cases speedometers window regulators side view mirrors window glass fenders hoods body shop mechanics shop don’t overpay at the mechanic girlpower sisters recyclers starters alternators AC compressors condensers airbags coil packs fuse boxes fuse

 

Hot Summer Car Care Tips

Hot Summer Car Care Tips

The arrival of summer marks an ideal time to make sure that your car or truck is in good working condition. The hot temperatures the summer heat can bring is tough on our vehicles. It can effect everything from the paint down to the tires. Below are a few tips you can follow so that you are not stranded in the heat. Protect your car against the hazards of summer.

unnamed (12)

  • Fluids

-Coolant, this is the number one thing you should stay on top of during summer months. This is normally easy to check or add and is generally done through the coolant reservoir located under the hood. You can consult to your owner’s manual for specific location. Be sure the level is between the minimum and maximum markings. Never open the radiator cap or coolant lid when the engine is hot.

-Motor oil, motorist can regularly check these on your own about once a month. Be sure your engine is cold or has been off at least 10 minutes. Pull out the dip stick and wipe it clean. Insert the dipstick back into the pipe and then pull it out again. Note how high the oil film reaches on the dipstick and the condition of the oil, and add or change the oil as needed. When you check your oil, if it is dirty or smells of gasoline, it should be changed. You don’t add oil into the tiny tube that the dipstick sits in. Look for a screw-off cap on top of the largest part of the engine. It could be blank or it could be labeled “Oil Cap” or something similar, and it might even indicate which grade of oil you ought to be using in your car. Unscrew that cap and add oil as needed.

Also be sure to keep up periodic maintenance like oil and filter changes and inspection or replacement of the air cleaner and fuel filters. Not only are these essential to the durability of your engine in the long term, but neglecting them will cause poor fuel economy in the short term, too. Performing regular maintenance means it will take less fuel to make that long highway trip. Maintaining proper tire pressure and using cruise control on the highway can further improve fuel economy, keeping your summer fuel costs down.

– Wiper Fluid, Windshield washer fluid is one of those maintenance items that you might overlook. Until you try to look through a dirty windshield while driving, that is. Find your washer fluid reservoir-it’s usually a white, translucent container with a windshield/water symbol on the cap. Note that if your vehicle has a rear wiper, there may be a second reservoir for it as well. Remove the cap(s) and check the fluid level in the reservoir(s). If it’s full, you don’t need to add any. If the fluid is low, carefully pour some into the reservoir(s) until it almost reaches the top. Do NOT use water if it freezes it can clog and damage reservoir and hoses. Replace the cap(s) and press down until it pops into place.

  • Tire Pressure

Tire pressure is also important, especially in summer months. As the outside temperature climbs, the air in your car’s tires expands, so check your tire pressure when the tires are at a normal temperature – before you set out on a road trip. Also, be sure to use the proper tire pressure for your car, not the maximum pressure listed on the tire sidewall. Check the recommended tire pressure label in the door jamb or glove compartment, or consult your owner’s manual. Tires that are over- or underinflated can reduce the vehicle’s handling capability or generate excess heat, causing a blowout. Although most newer cars have an on-board tire pressure monitoring system, get a good quality tire pressure gauge – a dial-type analog unit or digital gauge, not a straight, pen-type one – and check them yourself every few months. Don’t forget to check the pressure in your spare tire, too. It’s like an insurance policy. You never know when you might need it.

  • Air Conditioning 

Have your air conditioning checked annually. If your car’s a/c is not getting cold you could have a leak in the system. You can add refrigerant but it will only solve the problem temporarily, so you may want to invest in proper repair. Some a/c systems have a cabin air filtration system. Check your owner’s manual to see how often the filter should be changed. And if you see a little water dripping from your car, don’t worry. The a/c system drains condensation when it’s working properly. Also try to keep your car cool when your not driving.

The heat can cause cosmetic damage to your car and make it harder to cool off inside when you get in it to drive. You can protect it by regularly waxing your vehicle using a polish with UV protection to reduce sun damage and paint fading. You can protect your interior by placing a sunshade that keeps sun from coming in the windshield and fading, drying and cracking the inside of your vehicle and keep it cooler for when it’s time to go.

 

Following these simple tips will help your vehicle to perform its best this summer and will keep you from getting stranded in the heat.

 

 

EBAY New Car Smell Standridge Auto Parts www.standridgeauto.com

 

 

Four Mechanic Questions You Should Ask When Your Car Is in the Shop

Four Mechanic Questions You Should Ask When Your Car Is in the Shop

Here are four mechanic questions you should always ask when your car is in the shop beyond the ever-essential “how much will it cost?”

               →  Four Mechanic Questions You Should Ask When Your Car Is in the Shop ←

 

Mechanic

EBAY New Car Smell Standridge Auto Parts www.standridgeauto.com

Standridge Auto Parts Blog Posts follow our happenings @standridgeauto #standridgeauto gastonia charlotte greenville used automotive parts junkyards salvage parts cheap affordable car parts hollander store ebay! shop online via hollander http://standridge.hollanderstores.com/ shop our ebay store http://stores.ebay.com/standridgeautoparts1  Used auto body parts within gastonia, greer gaffney spartanburg rock hill forrest city rutherfordton cherryville lincolnton waco polkville fallston belmont charlotte north carolina south carolina georgia tennessee nashville blacksburg virgina kings mountain mount holly lattimore lawndale cliffside asheville hickory hills of north carolina marion greensboro the triangle pittsboro raleigh winston salem UNC NCSTATE cheap auto parts for college students locally owned and operated fort mill shadyside drag strip dirt track racing  nascar billy standridge Quality Used Auto Parts friendly service import domestics trucks auto recyclers wheels ARA foreign cars recycled vehicle parts gatlinburg tennessee classic cars car fun facts cars & trucks SUV SUT hummer motors engines transmissions drive shafts transfer cases speedometers window regulators side view mirrors window glass fenders hoods body shop mechanics shop don’t overpay at the mechanic girlpower sisters recyclers starters alternators AC compressors condensers airbags coil packs fuse boxes fuse panels cheap tires affordable batteries interstate batteries battery warranty cars for sale Tail lights fuel Pump head lights tail lights modules ecm pcm  radiators sunvisors door panels leaf springs seats front seats rear seats door swtches seat belts window

Standridge Auto Parts Blog Posts follow our happenings @standridgeauto #standridgeauto gastonia charlotte greenville used automotive parts junkyards salvage parts cheap affordable car parts hollander store ebay! shop online via hollander http://standridge.hollanderstores.com/ shop our ebay store http://stores.ebay.com/standridgeautoparts1  Used auto body parts within gastonia, greer gaffney spartanburg rock hill forrest city rutherfordton cherryville lincolnton waco polkville fallston belmont charlotte north carolina south carolina georgia tennessee nashville blacksburg virgina kings mountain mount holly lattimore lawndale cliffside asheville hickory hills of north carolina marion greensboro the triangle pittsboro raleigh winston salem UNC NCSTATE cheap auto parts for college students locally owned and

Timeline of the Automobile

A Fun Yard Photo Shoot

Do you know your Mustang Facts?

ford_mustang_row.196143528_std

Do you know your Mustang Facts?

Ford let the Mustang out of the stable in 1964!

Do you know your Mustang Facts? Did you know within the first 18 months of sales, over 1 Million cars were sold! That’s A LOT! On the first day of its release, more than 22,000 Mustangs were sold. In the first year, 418,810 Mustangs were sold, and more than one million were on the road within the Mustang’s first two years — which is still the fastest time for any new nameplate to reach that sales volume. In its early days, the Mustang was sold just as fast as Ford could build them.  fact, the fever for Mustangs was so intense that there’s a legend floating around of one Texas driver who slept in his new Mustang at the dealership overnight while his check cleared just to be sure the car wouldn’t be sold out from underneath him. By 1965, the Mustang was the most popular car in America. By 1966, nearly 2.5 million Mustangs were produced, and the Mustang moved Ford into the biggest selling domestic line in America, ahead of Chevrolet. Original sales forecasts expected the Mustang to sell less than 100,000 units in its first year, a benchmark that the model blew past at only three months old. The Mustang was so popular that even thousands of children wanted to get to drive one: in the Christmas season following the Mustang’s debut, 94,000 pedal powered toy Mustangs were sold. The Mustang remained incredibly popular for decades, with six figure sales from 1964 to 1990.

20160304_140416-1

The first Mustang, a convertible model with the VIN 5F08F100001, was intended to be used as a model to be sent on a tour of dealerships. But in Newfoundland, the vehicle was accidentally sold to a customer. That customer was an airline pilot who kept it and drove it for about 10,000 miles before trading it back to Ford for an equally auspicious numbered Mustang: Mustang number 1,000,001. Fortunately, Ford was able to preserve the first Mustang after the customer returned it, and the vehicle is on display at the Ford Museum in Dearborn, Michigan.

The Mustang was almost called a Cougar.

The car that created the pony class was almost named after a cat. Early sketches show the Mustang model named as a Cougar, and there were a number of badges and emblems designed with the name as late as 1963. In fact, the cougar silhouette looks similar to the mustang horse emblem that Mustangs have. Other names that were considered include the Torino, Bronco, Puma, Colt, Thunderbird II, and Panther. But thanks to intense market research, Ford settled on the Mustang, and the rest is history. Of course, Ford later debuted the Mercury Cougar, so the name wasn’t entirely lost — just misplaced for a while. Many say the Mustang name came from the World War II fighter plane with the same name, others maintain that it’s named after the half wild American Mustang horse.

An all American car, the two most popular Mustang colors throughout history have been red and blue.

For more than 50 years, red and blue have been the color preference of Ford Mustang owners. In all time overall color popularity, red comes in first with 21% and blue is a close second at 17%. Silver is not far behind at 14%, and white garners 13% of Mustang colors. Blue was particularly popular when the Mustang was introduced, while white took over in the mid to late 70s. By the 80s and 90s, red was established as a clear winner for Mustang colors. In fact, about one in five of all Mustangs built have been painted a shade of red. Now, black has become the most popular color in late generation mustangs.

 

Ford considered making a station wagon version of the Mustang.

Let’s not forget that the sporty Mustang was marketed not just to young hot rodders, but young adults with families, too. At one point, Ford considered offering a family car that could haul more than groceries with the Mustang Aspen station wagon. In fact, Ford is rumored to have created two Mustang Aspen station wagons in 1966, but if they exist, few if any people have seen them in the light of day. Still, a handful of custom Mustang station model builds exist, and even a yacht builder planned to build a custom sport wagon based on the Ford Shelby GT500.

The most expensive Mustang sold at auction went for more than $1 million. WOW!!!

n iconic vehicle, rare and notable Mustangs often command top bids at public auctions. In May 2013, a 1967 Shelby GT500 Super Snake sold for $1.3 million. The vehicle is incredibly rare: only one initial test car was built, and this one is it, making it an incredibly rare and sought after Mustang. There is one other Mustang that’s believed to be worth more: a 1968 Shelby EXP 500 Green Hornet with a number of notable experimental upgrades. The last time it was up for auction, it reached a top bid of $1.8 million in a January 2013 auction — but that still wasn’t enough to meet the reserve price. The vehicle remains with its original owner until a suitable offer can be found. Several other Mustangs have reached sales prices between $500,000 and $1 million, making this model incredibly valuable at auction.

20160304_140348

 

– The Mustang I Prototype was debuted on October. 7,1962 at the Watkins Glen racetrack in New York
– Ford introduced the Mustang II prototype at Watkins glen on the weekend of October. 6,1963
– The Mustang was premiered on April. 17, 1964 at New York’s World Fair
– 22,000 Mustangs were sold within the first day of its release.
– Within 2 years, over one million Mustangs were sold
– The first Mustang off the assembly line was sold (by mistake) to an airplane pilot.
– By December. 31, 1964, Ford had sold 263,434 cars.
– When the one year anniversary of the Mustang rolled around, Ford had already sold 418,810 Mustangs.
– Independant Rear Suspension was actually considered for performance versions of the Mustang way back in the 60s.
– There was no 2002 edition of the Mustang Cobra.
– The 1964.5 Mustangs were not really 1964.5 models. They were considered to actually be EARLY 1965’s. So, the first digit of the VIN number (last digit of the model year) was 5, not 4.
– The first Mustang’s VIN Number was 5F08F100001.
– The Fastback Mustang debuted on October. 1, 1964.
– Phil Clark is the original designer of the galloping horse logo.
– John Najjar, the original designer of the Mustang I Prototype (drawings) supposedly named his design after the P-51 Mustang airplane, but Lee Iacocca has stated a few times that it was directly named after the horse itself, not the airplane.
– Mustang production began on March. 9, 1964.
– The one-millionth Mustang was produced on February. 23, 1966.
– The popular movie (among Mustang enthusiasts), ‘Bullitt’, premiered on October. 17, 1968.
– Apparently, Lee Iacocca wanted the switch-over to the Mustang II to occur in 1968, but Ford’s President Bunkie Knudsen preferred the larger Mustangs. When Bunkie Knudsen left in `69, Lee Iacocca got to work on the Mustang II.
– Even though most people say that the first Mustang to roll off the assembly line was a White Convertible, Lee Iacocca says that the first Mustang was a hardtop.
– The 1974 Mustang II sold 3 times the amount of Mustangs that were sold in 1973.
– The first 1993 Mustang Cobra was built on December. 17, 1992.
– In the late 80s, Ford was considering moving the Mustang over to front-wheel drive. Thankfully, the loyal Mustang fans kept Ford from doing so. The Probe was the replacement that Ford produced.

-The 1994 Ford Mustang, which introduced the 4th generation Mustangs, was dramatically restyled to awaken its pony car heritage. The hatchback variant was dropped, leaving only a two door coupe and convertible. The SVT Cobra was carried over from the previous year and launched with a 240 horsepower 5.0 liter V8.

-1995 was the final model year for the 5.0 liter V8, which began life as the 260cid and later 289 cid engine. The second bare bones SVT Cobra R was introduced with a 300 horsepower 5.8 liter V8 and five speed manual transmission.

-In 1996, for the first time the Mustang GTs and SVT Mustang Cobras were equipped with 4.6 liter Dual Overhead Cam (DOHC) V8, producing 305 horsepower in the Cobra.

-Ford’s Passive Anti Theft System became standard on all models in 1997.

-In 1998 the output of Mustang GT’s 4.6 liter V8 was increased to 225 horsepower.

-A redesigned Mustang debuted in 1999. It sported sharper lines, pronounced wheel arches plus new hood, grille, fascias and lamps. The SVT Mustang Cobra became the first Mustang with independent rear suspension. The 4.6 liter DOHC V8 produced 320 horsepower.

-In 2000 the third Mustang SVT Cobra R was introduced in a 300 unit run. It came with a 386 horsepower 5.4 liter DOHC V8 mated to the Mustang’s first ever six-speed transmission.

-Inspired by the 1968 movie, the first Mustang Bullitt GT model was offered in 2000 and 2001. It featured unique side scoops, 17-inch “Bullitt”-styled wheels and lowered and specially-tuned suspension.

-In 2002 production ended for two of Mustang’s closest competitors: Chevrolet Camaro and Pontiac Firebird.

-The Mach 1 returned in 2003 with a 305 horsepower V8 under a signature ram air “Shaker” hood scoop. The newly redesigned SVT Cobra produced 390 supercharged horsepower.

-In 2004 Ford produced its 300 millionth car, a Mustang GT convertible 40th anniversary edition. The 2004 models were the last cars built at Ford’s fabled Dearborn Assembly Plant which had been building Mustangs since the car’s introduction in 1964.

-In 2005 production of the all new Mustang moved to the Flat Rock, Michigan Plant. The Mustang’s V6 engine was increased to 4.0 liters and the V8 increased to 300 horsepower.

-The V6 “Pony Package” debuted in 2006. GT models got 18″ wheels, and owners could configure instrument panel lighting in 125 different colors, using Ford’s MyColor instrument panel.

-In 2007 Ford introduced a special “Warriors in Pink” Mustang, designed to help raise funds for Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure breast cancer research. The vehicle lineup also included the Mustang Shelby GT and the Shelby GT500KR. The second limited-edition Mustang Bullitt was introduced in November.

-The 9 millionth Mustang, a GT convertible, was built in 2008 and sold to an Iowa farmer.

-The 2009 Ford Mustang featured a glass roof option and special 45th anniversary badging.

-The 2010 Mustang was introduced in November at the Los Angeles Auto Show. It cleverly combines modern technology with Mustang heritage and a V8 with even more horsepower and even throatier signature Mustang exhaust sound. It will be available at Ford dealerships later this spring.

Ford Sells Mustang Number One!

20160304_140320

 

Showing Off Your Vintage Vehicle — It’s All In The Detailing  

Showing Off Your Vintage Vehicle – It’s All In The Detailing

Standridge Auto Sales 1962 Rambler Classic

1962 Rambler Classic

Owning a vintage car is a responsibility. It’s a piece of history, maybe even art, and it’s your job to keep it looking good. You want to have pride in your ride whether enjoying a Sunday cruise or showing it off at the auto show. Do this well and you’ll be showered with compliments, you might take home prizes from local car shows, and best of all, you’ll increase its value.

In this blog we’ll explore the most effective and satisfying ways to get the exterior and interior of your vintage car into show-ready shape. Following the steps listed below will separate your ride from those that are merely clean. Let’s begin outside, followed by the interior, before finishing with the windows.

Detailing Supplies

You wouldn’t attempt an oil change without the right tools, and the same should apply to detailing. Set yourself up with:

  • Car wash liquid
  • Automotive glass cleaner
  • Wheel cleaner
  • Tire cleaner
  • Polish or clay bar set
  • Wax
  • Carpet shampoo
  • Leather conditioner
  • A selection of absorbent and microfiber cloths
  • Large bucket with grit guard
  • Wash mitt
  • Q-tips

Washing

Park in the shade and while the paint cools, fill a bucket with warm soapy water. Always use proper car wash liquid — never dish soap. It might work on your plates, but it’ll damage your paint!

Completely rinse your ride. Then starting with the roof, use the wash mitt to slather on the soapy water. If you’re doing this properly you’ll work from top to bottom making three circuits: one for the roof; one for the hood, windows and trunk; and the last one for doors, wheels and lights. Rinse the suds off your vehicle with clean water. Then take an absorbent cloth and dry the whole vehicle, again working from the top down.

Polish and Wax

If your vehicle was painted any time after 1980, there’s probably a clear film covering the paint itself. This clear coat keeps corrosive elements like tar, tree sap and bird droppings from damaging the paint. Polishing helps to smooth and remove swirls and minor scratches. You can use a buffing ball and polishing compound for this, but don’t do it too often, as you’ll rub away the clear coat. An alternative is to use a clay bar to remove grit and grime adhering to the surface.

Waxing adds a protective layer on top of the clear coat. First, apply an initial coat with a microfiber cloth, using a second cloth to buff the finish to a bright shine. Microfiber cloths saturated with wax make the job much easier. They’re the kind of product to keep in the glove box for a final clean after driving to a car show.

Wheels and Tires

Brake dust takes the shine off the smartest wheels and isn’t removed by washing. Instead, you’ll need a spritz of wheel cleaner followed by a good rinse. Dry with a clean absorbent cloth and use Q-tips to get into the tightest corners.

Tires tend to dull over time. Bring back the shine with some foam cleaner. Spray evenly over the sidewall, then wipe or rinse as the instructions direct. If you want sidewalls to look like new, a tire dressing will do the trick.

Interior

Remove floor mats and vacuum them thoroughly. To give your mats a showroom ready look, use a carpet shampoo product to remove stubborn dirt. Once finished, spray off the shampoo with water and mop your mats with an absorbent cloth. Wipe hard surfaces with a soft microfiber cloth — rather than interior wipes — which can leave a glossy sheen. Finish by vacuuming seats and carpets before putting the mats back.

Most fabric upholstery stains can be removed with upholstery cleaner. Leather should be treated with a leather conditioner. These cleaners will have specific instructions on how to use them properly.

Windows

Always use an ammonia-free automotive glass cleaner together with a microfiber cloth. To clean the top of the window, roll the windows down to remove the border of grime that builds up over time. Then roll the window up to clean the bottom. Windshields and rear windows are hard to reach, but they’re easier with a microfiber cloth over the back of the hand. On the rear window be careful not to damage any heater elements.

Detailing takes effort, but the reward comes from onlookers’ admiration, car show prizes and higher resale value of your vintage vehicle. Plus, even if you have no intention of selling, it’s satisfying to know you’ve helped preserve a piece of automotive history.

Author Bio

Carmen Fiordirosa is the Director of Marketing at CleanTools. When not at work, Carmen is busy cleaning her own home and taking care of her four children. CleanTools produces a variety of drying and polishing products for home use.

Paint Chip on your Car? DIY Repair Guide

Paint Chip on your Car? DIY Repair Guide

Paint Chip Repairs on your car are easier than you think. Use this guide and do it yourself (DIY).

You have paint chip on your car ? It never fails, even moments after you drive away from the auto detailer with a perfect pritine car. A Rock or some kind of Road debris will hit your car before you know it. Why spend money having it repaired when you can easily do it yourself?

I don’t recommend you trying to attempt a major body work job but the small ones you can do easily and have a professional looking job. Just follow these steps below.

 

10502035_659655884088777_1368226133652284560_n

First you want to check your car for the paint code so you can purchase paint to match your car perfectly. The Car Paint Code can be found in a variety of places, including the doorjamb, firewall, underside of the hood or trunk.

  1. Begin by removing any wax from the damaged area and thoroughly clean it using prep solvent with a lint-free cloth. Dishwashing liquid will also work. Make sure your workspace is well ventilated, especially if the repair is large enough to require aerosol spray.
  2. Fill any small dents (with common fillers or bondo for small fills). Sand the area smooth using 320-grit sandpaper; working up to 600-grit or higher. Follow with a primer coat and sand that using the same steps.
  3. If you are only repairing small rock chips and scratches these can be fixed using a paint pen or brush. Make sure that the area you are repairing is narrower than the width of the pen or brush so the paint blends properly.
  4. Use the flat side of the paint pen or wide side of the brush: the pointy tip of the pen will not cover enough area to make the repair invisible. Apply the paint in a single slow stroke to evenly cover the area.
  5. The current industry standard for paint requires a base coat and clear coat. Some older cars require single stage paint to match the factory color. Make sure that each layer dries completely before the next. While this may take about 10 minutes for a small repair in dry climate, a larger repair in a humid area can take significantly longer.
  6. If the area is large enough to require aerosol, mask off surrounding panels using masking film or masking tape plus plastic. Have a couple of practice cards on hand so you can practice your spraying technique before beginning the actual repair.
  7. Spray back and forth in a sweeping motion: the goal is to produce a finish thick enough to be smooth but not drip and an even thickness all the way across. For beginners, the easiest method is to overspray slightly onto the masked area. A more experienced painter can spray to the edge, leaving a blending area between the factory paint and the repair.
  8. All automotive paint requires time to cure. Do not wash the car for at least a week after completing the repair and don’t wax it for a month.

 

The Automotive Touchup website includes a library of how-to videos and advice on how to locate the factory paint codes. A full array of touch-up paint and touch-up kits are available on eBay.

 

Shop our ebay store